BLOG / Blog Statement of Purpose


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When I began the redesign process for my new website I wrestled with the idea of reincorporating a blog as a core part of my web presence. In a past life of my website I had started a blog and I thought it was pretty good. I would post photos from personal projects I was doing (I didn’t have any paying clients at the time) and write down a few thoughts to complement the photos. I would post regularly, sometimes even daily. And I would rejoice whenever someone left a comment, even if that someone was my wife cheering me on. Everything was going well. But then a couple of months passed by and I found my blog posts becoming more sporadic. It wasn’t that I wasn’t enjoying my blog. Rather, I was getting busy with other things, and posting to the blog was one of the first sacrifices to the demands of the time gods. Before too long I was forced to acknowledge that my blog was dead, and rather than attempting to resurrect it, I laid it to rest by removing it from my site. That was over a year ago.

In the interim time from the death of my blog to the redesign of my new site, I climbed up on the shoulders (and will remain there) of photographers such as Chase Jarvis, David Hobby (Strobist), David duChemin, Zack Arias, Matt Brandon (The Digital Trekker), and other photographers who were contributing so much to the photography community through their blogs. I spent a lot of time soaking in their knowledge and experience as they so generously gave back to the community. It was a rich time of learning as I continued to shoot on my own and read as much as I could.

As I considered starting up my own blog again, I realized that there was a very real difference between my original blog and the blogs of the aforementioned photographers (aside from the fact that the aforementioned photographers had much more knowledge and experience than me). Photographers such as Jarvis, Hobby, duChemin, Arias, and Brandon knew what they were passionate about, understood their own voice, and recognized who their audience was. I was still unsure of what I was passionate about, didn’t really know what I wanted to say, and had no idea who I was trying to speak to. I had no clear vision for my blog. And as the old proverb goes, “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” Or in my case, my blog perished.

If I was going to reincorporate a sustainable blog into my work, I had to find a clear vision for my blog. I had discovered some of my passions — humanitarian/world/cultural photography and teaching/mentoring — but I still wasn’t sure what I wanted to say and to whom I wanted to say it. It was about this time that Photoshelter released their Photography Blog Handbook, a resource that was immensely helpful to me as I began thinking through my own blog. In the handbook, Photoshelter highlighted various photographers who had found success with their blogs. I saw that there was a common theme with each highlight: for their blogs the photographers defined their photographic specialty, their goals, their audience, key elements of their blog, and what would (or did) make their blog successful.

So I attempted to do the same, but additionally included what topics I desire to write about, and now present it here. It is my vision, my hope, my statement of purpose, for this blog.

Specialty

Humanitarian, World, and Cultural Photography

Goals

  • Help other emerging photographers navigate the life and business of photography
  • Inspire people to action through socially-minded photography
  • Connect with current and potential clients
  • Connect with fine art photo buyers [future goal]
  • Promote workshops and tours that I lead [future goal]

Topics

  • Thoughts on vision
  • Business tips/thoughts
  • Thoughts on creativity
  • Equipment/book reviews
  • Wallpaper/Postcards (specially highlighted images I have created)
  • Thoughts on art, faith, and humanity

Audience

  • Photography community
  • Current clients
  • Potential clients
  • Art appreciators
  • Art buyers

Key Elements

  • Consistent, frequent posting
  • Interact with commenters

And so it begins. My hope is that this blog will be not just be a creative outlet for me, but that it will be a helpful contribution to larger discussions about photography, business, art, culture and more. If you are reading this, I invite you to join with me as I begin this journey.